Useful links

Thanks to an active intervention program, at Whangarei Heads we really do have kiwi in our backyard.

Read more!

Wally

Wally hatched in December 2006 at the McGrath’s farm at Purua. In the same nest was also Wally’s brother Lambert with their dad George.
Wally is named after Wally Lambert a farmer from many years ago who looked after the native bush on his farm where George now lives.
Wally was transferred to Limestone Island at 10 days old weighing only 260g.
Wheres Wally?
Wally has an extraordinary back story, he was monitored from 2006-2009, until he dropped his transmitter – miraculously 9 years – later Todd found him in a burrow with Mokopuna a young female released at Parua Bay in March 2018.

To find out about Wally’s early history – scroll right down to the bottom of this page and start at PART ONE, PART TWO  picks up 9 years later as we record his life from 2018 into the future.

November 2018

Wally is 79 days nesting today – so hatch is definitely due.  Moko is nearby.

October 2018

This new couple have got on with things and Wally was 37 days nesting on 19/10/18 with an average 2 hours nightly activity. Moko is nearby.

September 2018

After the big news of these two hooking up last month the news is even better now- they have started nesting in the bush at the end of Campbell road. Wally was nesting 8 days on 19/9/18. Even though he is 12 years old this could well be his first nest so it may take him a while to get the hang of it.  He was in super fat condition prior to nesting so will be on a crash diet now.

August 2018

In August I caught up with Mokopuna for her transmitter band change – she has grown to 2450g and is looking good – but the big news is that she has found herself a boy.  The fattest male I have ever seen at 3250g!  He is our old mate Wally who we released at Kauri Mt in 2008. I was just in the right place at the right time to catch him as he was sneaking through the pampas.
His ID chip – # 0006830BDF identified him in my records. He has travelled a little way and by his weight has been sitting on his butt enjoying single life ever since then. He is in for a crash diet if they start nesting! The other good news is that it is a safe place for kiwi. The property owner and neighbouring properties either don’t allow dogs or have very good dog control. We have been trapping for stoats down Campbell road for the past few years so they have chosen a good place to raise chicks. Both Mokopuna and Wally have newly fitted radio transmitters so watch out for more of their story.

Mokopuna departs

2018 August

PART TWO, Mokopuna was one of the kiwi released at the Parua Bay community centre back in March- she is a young female kiwi.  After spending time in the pampas at the Lamb road quarry she headed north and settled in the bush/pines at the end of Campbell. I suspected that she may have found a boy there because she was holding in a relatively small area and a nearby landowner confirmed that he had heard a male kiwi calling, so we were hopeful.

In August I caught up with Mokopuna for her transmitter band change – she has grown to 2450g and is looking good – but the big news is that she has found herself a boy.  The fattest male I have ever seen at 3250g!  He is our old mate Wally who we released at Kauri Mt in 2008. I was just in the right place at the right time to catch him as he was sneaking through the pampas. His ID chip – # 0006830BDF identified him in my records. He has travelled a little way and by his weight has been sitting on his butt enjoying single life ever since then. He is in for a crash diet if they start nesting! The other good news is that it is a safe place for kiwi. The property owner and neighbouring properties either don’t allow dogs or have very good dog control. We have been trapping for stoats down Campbell road for the past few years so they have chosen a good place to raise chicks. Both Mokopuna and Wally have newly fitted radio transmitters so watch out for more of their story.

Mokopuna 2018

2009, May

Wally has moved to the back of Jim Comrie’s between Kauri Mt Road and Kerr road.
From here I lost his signal – I searched all over Kauri Mt and Kerr Road. Where is bloody Wally? Had his transmitter failed? Was he hiding in a deep gut? His transmitter battery was due to run out in August 2009 so after September I gave up looking for him – his transmitter attachment band would wear through shortly and the transmitter fall off. Wally could carry on his business in secret….. Scroll up to Part 2 continued where we pick up 9 years later with Wally.

2009 April

Local landowner Juliet Langley gave me a hand and we tracked him down in the Kauri Mt reserve. He was 2125g and 102.2mm bill – so pretty much full grown.

Wally and Juliet Langley 2009

2008 August

May – Wally was released at Zac’s place at Kauri Mountain and quickly moved up and over the hill/mountain to the northern side.Where is Wally? Over the next few months Wally proved to be pretty good at hiding and even when I could find where he was he avoiding capture in the ladder fern and scrub.

2006–2009

PART ONE: 2008, After Wally’s transfer to Limestone Island and almost two years later on 22/7/2008 we caught Wally using a kiwi finding dog. He was 1775g and had a bill of 95.5mm so was well ready to come back to the mainland.

 

 

 

 

Comments are closed.

WHANGAREI HEADS LANDCARE FORUM